Sunday, October 20, 2019

Friday, October 18, 2019

The Outsider


Today's Astronomy Picture of the Day is a Hubble Space Telescope image of Comet 2I/Borisov, the second body to be recognized as an interstellar interloper coming in for a visit to our neighborhood.

Thursday, October 17, 2019

System in a System


Today's Astronomy Picture of the Day shows a Cassini Orbiter image which managed to capture five of the moons of Saturn (plus a bit of the rings) in one shot.

Wednesday, October 16, 2019

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Dark Sky


Today's Astronomy Picture of the Day shows us what our dark and empty night sky would show us if we could "see" as well as our digital eyes.

Monday, October 14, 2019

The Busy Sky


Today's Astronomy Picture of the Day shows Messier 31, the Andromeda Galaxy. 300 images, each taken over 30 seconds were stacked. As a result, the quiet sky is streaked with meteors, satellites, airplane lights and more. "Mouseover" the image in the link to switch between the two versions: cleaned up and "natural" or see the second image below.


Sunday, October 13, 2019

Jewell Cluster


Today's Astronomy Picture of the Day shows NGC 290, an open cluster in the constellation of Tucana and is part of the Small Magellanic Cloud, one of the "satellite" galaxies that accompany The Milky Way.

Saturday, October 12, 2019

Two Perspectives


Today's Astronomy Picture of the Day shows our blue dot from two vastly different perspectives: Earth as seen from Saturn (900 million miles), Earth as seen from Mercury (61 million miles).

Friday, October 11, 2019

Thursday, October 10, 2019

Wednesday, October 9, 2019

Tuesday, October 8, 2019

Sunday, October 6, 2019

Saturday, October 5, 2019

Five Moons


Today's Astronomy Picture of the Day shows the waxing Moon and four more. Four? Look carefully and you'll spot Jupiter and four of the Galilean moons.

Thursday, October 3, 2019

Tuesday, October 1, 2019

Safety First!

Today's Astronomy Picture of the Day is a short (humorous) video about being safe around black holes. Safety first when traveling interstellar danger zones!